Rusumo Power Project to start soon

THE Rusumo power project will take off soon early next month, will cost about TZS 6bn/-, and it covers three countries, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi.The power plant once completed will produce about 70 megawatts of electricity. Each country will be supplied with not less than 20 megawatts depending on factors like ownership and demands of the targeted population, .

More information here http://allafrica.com/stories/201204130083.html

The government of Tanzania plans to spend 1.2…

The government of Tanzania plans to spend 1.2 trillion Tanzanian shillings (US$740 million) by the end of next year for emergency power projects aimed at ending chronic energy shortages in east Africa’s second-largest economy.

Read more from http://www.esi-africa.com/Tanzania/spend/740/million/dollars/emergency/power

Wind power generation development opportunity in Tanzania

The Rural Energy Agency in Tanzania invites qualified wind power projects developer for supply and installation of wind turbines in Makambako, Karatu, Mkumbara, Singida, Mafia and Rukwa sites in Tanzania.

More details in the file attached.

Invitation for wind power generation in Tanzania.pdf

Solar power to benefit villagers

Residents of 11 villages in Kisarawe District will this year benefit from a solar power project to be financed by the Sun Bio-fuels firm.

Under the project, the company, which has invested in a bio-fuel project in the district, planned to spend up to 50,000 sterling pounds for distributing solar power panels in the villages.

The company’s chief executive officer, Mr Richard Morgan said in Kisarawe recently that the project was meant to supply power to the community and create employment in the local community.

“We are aware that people are in need of water, fuel and infrastructure, and other related issues, but we also thought that power was also essential to them,” he said.

He said that, power was useful especially during this time when Africa for the first time will be hosting the World Cup in South Africa, saying: “It is not fair to deny people from watching the football tournament.”

According to Mr Morgan, his company was working in partnership with Philips International in order to bring opportunity and light to the local communities.

Mr Morgan added that, his firm expected to conduct a pilot study in August in order to establish the actual cost for supplying energy to more villages.

The bio-fuel project, which started early this year in the eleven villages in Kisarawe district, is expected to offer employment opportunities to more than 2,000 youths from the surrounding villages.

Source: The Citizen

Tanesco spends over 5bn/- on subsidies

Each worker given 750 units of power monthly for 3,500/-

Cash-strapped Tanzania Electric Supply Company (Tanesco) spends over 5bn/- per year in subsidizing electricity units for its employees as an incentive, The Guardian has learnt.
A survey conducted by this newspaper has established that every employee at Tanesco receives 750 electricity units worth 3,500/- every month.
This means that a Tanesco employee buys a unit at 4/67 compared to an ordinary consumer who pays between 118/- and 128/- for a unit of power.
Each Tanesco worker is therefore, entitled to 9,000 units of electricity annually at 42,030/- only, while an ordinary consumer pays 1,080,000/- for the same number of units per year.
Sources within the company confirmed to The Guardian that every employee was getting 750 units of electricity monthly at 3,500/-.
“We are given the units as bonuses, but it is limited to one house. If you have other houses, then you have to buy power for them at normal prices,” said one source.
The sources further said that couples working at the company were getting 1,500 units per month.
According to sources, the number of Tanesco employees countrywide was nearly 5,000 by December, last year, each of whom was entitled to the units.
Asked whether or not the 750 power units the company was providing to its employees was part of Tanesco’s policy, the Minister for Energy and Minerals, William Ngeleja advised this reporter to seek the response from Tanesco board chairman, deputy board chairperson or Tanesco CEO.
When contacted, Tanesco Acting Executive Director, Eng. Stephen Mabada declined to comment, only saying: “This is Tanesco’s week. Let’s write what is happening during the week.”
Pressed further, Mabada said: “Just go and write.”
The power utility announced on Monday that its accumulated losses had been reduced from 186bn/- in 2006 to 22bn/- in 2008.
Tanesco has to a large extent continued to rely on subsidy, especially for investment financing, due to prolonged power shedding, which has affected its revenue base.
The company requested the government to provide 312bn/- from its 2009/2010 budget to enable the company implement emergency projects aimed at reducing annoyance to the customers.
In the 2007/2008 financial year, the government announced that it would no longer subsidise the company’s operations, saying it would only guarantee funds Tanesco borrowed from international financial institutions for investment.
The Vice chairperson of the Parliamentary Parastatal Organization Accounts Committee (POAC), Estherine Kilasi (CCM – Mbarali) said her committee was not aware of the matter.
She further said that the committee had gone through the 2008 audited report but the issue was not mentioned at all.
“Maybe they will bring it up next year when we are going through the 2009 audit report, but as of now, we do not know anything,” she said.
She however, said private companies used to audit paratastals and would later send audited reports to the Board of Directors of a responsible institution.
Renatus Mkinga who is Executive Director for Action Development Forward wondered why Tanesco was granting such incentives at a time when it was facing financial problems and not producing surplus electricity.
“I think the initiative was copied from the South African power firm, the Electricity Supply Commission (ESCOM), which provides subsdised units as incentives to its employee from surplus electricity,” said Mkinga.
He noted that for the last 10 to 15 years, the company had been providing its employee with 300 to 400 units, but said raising these to 750 units was unacceptable, especially when the company is struggling financially.
SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN

Another Energy Services Platform (ESP/MFP) Has Been Installed By TaTEDO in Rukwa Region

In a period of two weeks; from 27th November to 16th December 2009, number of TaTEDO’s project activities has been implemented in Sumbawanga District, Rukwa Region. One of the activities was the installation of Multifunctional Platform (MFP)/ Energy Service Platform (ESP) at Laela Village, located at Laela ward in Sumbawanga District Council. The installed ESP is the combination……… More

TaTEDO’s Potentials to Facilitate Scale up and Replication of Improved Biomass Energy Technologies and Services in Tanzania

Since 2006 TaTEDO has been implementing a four year Bioenergy program: “The Integrated Improved Woodfuels Services for Poverty Reduction in Tanzania”. The main article in this issue highlights on selected milestones noted during evaluation of this programme. The milestones partly confirm existing potential capacity of TaTEDO to facilitate biomass energy interventions in terms of technologies and services in Tanzania.

Please read more here